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Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 4th 13, 07:22 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Sam Wormley[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 775
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-large-planet/


Black holes have a fearsome reputation that's only partly justified.
The maw of a black hole is indeed a potentially destructive thing,
but most matter—including gas stripped from nearby stars—is not
destined to end inside the black hole. Instead, a lot of it ends
orbiting the black hole, and the energy that's released by the
material that is getting swallowed blasts a lot of material back out
into space. So, black holes don't simply devour every object that
comes near them.

All of this makes a new observation particularly interesting.
Astronomers M. Nikołajuk and R. Walter caught a black hole in the act
of destroying and consuming part of a large planet or small brown
dwarf. This event involved a supermassive black hole located in a
relatively nearby galaxy, and emitted a burst of intense X-ray light
that fluctuated over a short time span, then faded. The flare and its
aftermath behaved as expected if the black hole disrupted an object
at least 14 times Jupiter's mass, then consumed about 10 percent of
the gas that once was part of the object.



Best read the whole article before commenting:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-large-planet/


  #2  
Old April 4th 13, 11:59 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,339
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

On 2013.04.04 15:22 , Sam Wormley wrote:
Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-large-planet/


Black holes have a fearsome reputation that's only partly justified.
The maw of a black hole is indeed a potentially destructive thing,
but most matter—including gas stripped from nearby stars—is not
destined to end inside the black hole. Instead, a lot of it ends
orbiting the black hole, and the energy that's released by the
material that is getting swallowed blasts a lot of material back out
into space. So, black holes don't simply devour every object that
comes near them.

All of this makes a new observation particularly interesting.
Astronomers M. Nikołajuk and R. Walter caught a black hole in the act
of destroying and consuming part of a large planet or small brown
dwarf. This event involved a supermassive black hole located in a
relatively nearby galaxy, and emitted a burst of intense X-ray light
that fluctuated over a short time span, then faded. The flare and its
aftermath behaved as expected if the black hole disrupted an object
at least 14 times Jupiter's mass, then consumed about 10 percent of
the gas that once was part of the object.



Best read the whole article before commenting:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-large-planet/



NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...


--
"There were, unfortunately, no great principles on which parties
were divided – politics became a mere struggle for office."
-Sir John A. Macdonald

  #3  
Old April 5th 13, 12:33 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
J. J. Lodder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 572
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

Alan Browne wrote:

On 2013.04.04 15:22 , Sam Wormley wrote:
Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...dismembers-and

-eats-a-large-planet/


Black holes have a fearsome reputation that's only partly justified.
The maw of a black hole is indeed a potentially destructive thing, but
most matterincluding gas stripped from nearby stars is not destined to
end inside the black hole. Instead, a lot of it ends orbiting the black
hole, and the energy that's released by the material that is getting
swallowed blasts a lot of material back out into space. So, black holes
don't simply devour every object that comes near them.

All of this makes a new observation particularly interesting.
Astronomers M. Niko?ajuk and R. Walter caught a black hole in the act
of destroying and consuming part of a large planet or small brown
dwarf. This event involved a supermassive black hole located in a
relatively nearby galaxy, and emitted a burst of intense X-ray light
that fluctuated over a short time span, then faded. The flare and its
aftermath behaved as expected if the black hole disrupted an object
at least 14 times Jupiter's mass, then consumed about 10 percent of
the gas that once was part of the object.



Best read the whole article before commenting:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...dismembers-and

-eats-a-large-planet/


NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...


That's obvious. If on the wrong orbit it won't be there.
Stars get eaten only when their orbits are perturbed
by a close collision with another star.

The rate for that can be estimated,
and is in reasonble agreement
with what we see of past activity,

Jan
  #4  
Old April 5th 13, 09:00 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,339
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

On 2013.04.05 08:33 , J. J. Lodder wrote:
Alan Browne wrote:


NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...


That's obvious. If on the wrong orbit it won't be there.
Stars get eaten only when their orbits are perturbed
by a close collision with another star.

The rate for that can be estimated,
and is in reasonble agreement
with what we see of past activity,


The past is not always a good indicator of the future.

The point of the program was that BH's in galaxies go through "feeding
frenzies" when there's a lot of material nearby (stars, gas, everything
in between). Once the plate has been cleaned a stable state is
achieved. What is not clear is if in the lifetime of a galaxy if there
will be another "feeding frenzy" at a later stage or if the BH is
relegated to occasional morsels of the odd star or other objects that
happen by.

--
"There were, unfortunately, no great principles on which parties
were divided politics became a mere struggle for office."
-Sir John A. Macdonald

  #5  
Old April 6th 13, 10:51 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
oriel36[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

On Apr 5, 12:59*am, Alan Browne
wrote:
On 2013.04.04 15:22 , Sam Wormley wrote:









Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-hole-dismembe....


Black holes have a fearsome reputation that's only partly justified.
The maw of a black hole is indeed a potentially destructive thing,
but most matter—including gas stripped from nearby stars—is not
destined to end inside the black hole. Instead, a lot of it ends
orbiting the black hole, and the energy that's released by the
material that is getting swallowed blasts a lot of material back out
into space. So, black holes don't simply devour every object that
comes near them.


All of this makes a new observation particularly interesting.
Astronomers M. Nikołajuk and R. Walter caught a black hole in the act
of destroying and consuming part of a large planet or small brown
dwarf. This event involved a supermassive black hole located in a
relatively nearby galaxy, and emitted a burst of intense X-ray light
that fluctuated over a short time span, then faded. The flare and its
aftermath behaved as expected if the black hole disrupted an object
at least 14 times Jupiter's mass, then consumed about 10 percent of
the gas that once was part of the object.


Best read the whole article before commenting:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/...-hole-dismembe....


NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. *Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. *None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. *The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...

--
"There were, unfortunately, no great principles on which parties
* were divided – politics became a mere struggle for office."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-Sir John A. Macdonald


'Black holes' are not physical entities but exist only in the
imagination of mathematicians,likewise 'big bang' is another one of
these 'no circumference/no center' ideologies for people who know no
better and are detached from physical considerations.

The idea that any person can not only see the past but see the
evolutionary timeline of the Universe directly,and this is what 'big
bang' assertion states,is as close to intellectual oblivion as a
person can be but then again this is what happens when an entire
society bases its observations on celestial sphere modeling via the
late 17th century Royal Society empiricists.It is though an enormous
joke is being played out on society with nobody appreciative of the
joke.Although mathematicians make much of a 'black hole' and couch the
geometrical difference between an imagined event horizon and
singularity in voodoo terms,it really is nothing more than an expanded
absurdity they recognized in the 15th century when trying to discern
planetary motions through stellar circumpolar motion -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKtXC0YWdbc


The great astronomers recognized the horror of these 'no center/no
circumference' ideologies which is why they tried to discover the
motions of the Earth as opposed to the dreary empiricists of today who
embrace this mindnumbing junk of black hole/big bang which imagine
individual objects or the entire Universe in no center/no
circumference terms.

"Suppose person A were on the earth somewhere below the north pole of
the heavens and person B were at the north pole of the heavens. In
that case, to A the pole would appear to be at the zenith, and A would
believe himself to be at the center; to B the earth would appear to be
at the zenith, and B would believe himself to be at the center. Thus,
A's zenith would be B's center, and B's zenith would be A's And
wherever anyone would be, he would believe himself to be at the
center.Therefore, merge these different imaginative pictures so that
the center is the zenith and vice versa. Thereupon you will see--
through the intellect..that the world and its motion and shape cannot
be apprehended. For [the Universe] will appear as a wheel in a wheel
and a sphere in a sphere-- having its center and circumference
nowhere. . . " Nicolas of Cusa 15th century

Of course the present day empiricists who have a total disregard for
geometry and physical considerations adopt the most hideous view
imaginable by adopting the very thing that astronomers in other eras
rejected .Ultimately the joke of big bang/black hole is on those who
willingly follow what is essentially poor late 17th century thinking
which was always going to throw up these hideous things that exist
only in the imagination,even a brief comparison with Cusa's thinking
above with contemporary views should be enough for any intelligent
reader to be struck by the similarities apart from the fact that the
older astronomers were running as fast as they could from these
observations -

"There is no edge in this figure except for the arbitrary cropping
that I have done to make it fit on the page. You might think that by
backtracking the velocity vectors you can locate the center of the Big
Bang (and it is at A) but this is not the case! Consider the
velocities measured by observers on galaxy B: since they can only
measure relative velocities, the velocities seen by B are the vector
difference between the velocity seen by A and the velocity of B as
seen by A. The figure below shows these velocities relative to B which
are measured by observers on galaxy B:"

http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/nocenter.html

It is quite a sight watching what it appears to be grown children
talking about 'feeding frenzies' using imaginary objects that
ultimately result from a poor conclusion drawn centuries ago by a man
involved in timekeeping.I wouldn't even give you credit Browne for
understanding what Archbishop Cusa wrote as Western astronomy moved
away from celestial sphere geometry and towards the planetary dynamics
of the Earth.

  #6  
Old April 7th 13, 11:40 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
J. J. Lodder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 572
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

Alan Browne wrote:

On 2013.04.05 08:33 , J. J. Lodder wrote:
Alan Browne wrote:


NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...


That's obvious. If on the wrong orbit it won't be there.
Stars get eaten only when their orbits are perturbed
by a close collision with another star.

The rate for that can be estimated,
and is in reasonble agreement
with what we see of past activity,


The past is not always a good indicator of the future.


In this case it is.
Standard statistical mechanics.

Jan
  #7  
Old April 7th 13, 12:45 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,339
Default Om nom nom: black hole dismembers and eats a large planet

On 2013.04.07 07:40 , J. J. Lodder wrote:
Alan Browne wrote:

On 2013.04.05 08:33 , J. J. Lodder wrote:
Alan Browne wrote:


NOVA put on a very good episode about the BH at the center of the Milky
Way about 6 years ago. Entire stars whipping around it in very
elliptical orbits. None getting "swallowed" or even damaged - they stay
well outside the event horizon. The BH is said to be "quiet" rather
than "feeding" ...

That's obvious. If on the wrong orbit it won't be there.
Stars get eaten only when their orbits are perturbed
by a close collision with another star.

The rate for that can be estimated,
and is in reasonble agreement
with what we see of past activity,


The past is not always a good indicator of the future.


In this case it is.
Standard statistical mechanics.


For the larger issue of the BH 'feeding frenzy' v. quiet (that you
stripped out) it remains an open question.

--
"There were, unfortunately, no great principles on which parties
were divided politics became a mere struggle for office."
-Sir John A. Macdonald

 




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