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eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 25th 15, 06:39 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Sam Wormley[_2_]
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Default eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe

eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe
http://gpsworld.com/eloran-progresse...in-u-s-europe/



As of June 19, eLoran is on the air in the United States. The
low-frequency signal emanates from a single station, a former U.S.
Coast Guard Loran Unit in Wildwood, N.J., which sports a 625-foot
signal mast that has been out of action for five years. The signal is
receivable at distances of up to 1,000 miles.

The facility began generating eLoran pulses at the press of a command
button by Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R, N.J). Present for the
ceremonial start of a 12-month demonstration and research program
under the aegis of the Department of Homeland Security were project
participants Charles Schue, CEO of UrsaNav; Pam Drew, president of
Harris Information Systems; and Dana Goward, president of the
Resilient Navigation and Timing Foundation.


“This is a phoenix arriving. We have the opportunity to add 2015
technology to the older idea,” said Schue of UrsaNav, once Coast
Guard commanding officer at the former Loran station. “A prudent
mariner always has two systems to navigate.”


  #2  
Old June 27th 15, 11:00 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
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Default eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe

On 2015-06-25 13:39, Sam Wormley wrote:

Guard commanding officer at the former Loran station. “A prudent
mariner always has two systems to navigate.”


That's why there's GLONASS, Galileo and even Beidou2.



  #3  
Old June 28th 15, 05:04 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Marcelo Pacheco
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Posts: 23
Default eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe

On Saturday, June 27, 2015 at 7:00:30 PM UTC-3, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2015-06-25 13:39, Sam Wormley wrote:

Guard commanding officer at the former Loran station. "A prudent
mariner always has two systems to navigate."


That's why there's GLONASS, Galileo and even Beidou2.


Which are all low power easy to jam systems.
  #4  
Old June 28th 15, 04:22 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
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Posts: 1,339
Default eLoran Progresses Toward GPS Back-Up Role in U.S., Europe

On 2015-06-28 00:04, Marcelo Pacheco wrote:
On Saturday, June 27, 2015 at 7:00:30 PM UTC-3, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2015-06-25 13:39, Sam Wormley wrote:

Guard commanding officer at the former Loran station. "A prudent
mariner always has two systems to navigate."


That's why there's GLONASS, Galileo and even Beidou2.


Which are all low power easy to jam systems.


Spouting jam threats is how projects like eLoran get funded.
(eg: Solution seeks problem).

It takes a lot of power to jam a lot of receivers over a large area.
(Or a lot of small jammers deployed over a wide area...)

Jammers are very easy to detect of course, including azimuth to jammer.

Null steering antennas can point a null at a jammer (or spoofer) near
instantly.

So if it were a real, developing, threat, low cost commercial null
steering antennas for ships and aircraft could be deployed quite quickly.

The only drawback with null steering antennas is their relative bulk
compared to aircraft GPS antennas - so would not be a welcome addition
to aircraft. But the processing, electronics and antenna for such can
be made relatively cheaply given sufficient volume.

Further of course, you cannot use eLoran for precision approach.

The only real threat right now is truckers using GPS jammers to prevent
their co. from tracking them. However the FCC has begun fining the
drivers ($31,875 in one case[1]). The driver was then fired by his
employer. As word of that gets around (have you ever been in an
American truck stop? Bitching about the government is usually topic #1).

And the FCC has fined a Chinese co. that sells jammers to Americans ($35M).

[1] August 2013: FCC proposed a fine of nearly $32,000 for an individual
whose illegal use of a GPS jamming device on the highway outside Newark
Airport interfered with an aviation safety system in 2012. LEARN MORE

April 2013: FCC fined two companies for using illegal signal jammers at
their worksites. The fines were set at $144,000 and $125,000, respectively.

October 2012: FCC announced enforcement actions against individuals
selling signal jamming devices on craigslist.org, warning that the
Bureau intends to impose substantial monetary penalties for similar
violations going forward.

October 2011: FCC announced it had issued 20 enforcement actions against
online retailers in 12 states for illegally marketing more than 200
uniquely-described models of jamming devices.
 




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