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sci.geo.satellite-nav (Global Satellite Navigation) (sci.geo.satellite-nav) Discussion of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Topics include the technical aspects of GNSS operation, user experiences in the use of GNSS, information regarding GNSS products and discussion of GNSS policy (such as GPS selective availability).

A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 11th 16, 12:34 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav,alt.satellite.gps
Hans-Georg Michna
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Posts: 764
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

Jamie Condliffe

GPS is an utterly pervasive and wonderful technology, but it’s
increasingly not accurate enough for modern demands. Now a team
of researchers can make it accurate right down to an inch. ...

Read the complete article at
http://gizmodo.com/a-new-technique-m...nch-1758457807

Hans-Georg

Followup-To: sci.geo.satellite-nav
  #2  
Old February 13th 16, 10:35 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
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Posts: 1,338
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

On 2016-02-11 08:34, Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
Jamie Condliffe

GPS is an utterly pervasive and wonderful technology, but it’s
increasingly not accurate enough for modern demands. Now a team


It's more accurate than its design goal. Not bad. Perhaps it should
solve the refugee crisis too? Or the financial crisis that will never end?

of researchers can make it accurate right down to an inch. ...


Don't think so.


Read the complete article at
http://gizmodo.com/a-new-technique-m...nch-1758457807


Really no way it can be more accurate than the GPS estimate of position
unless there is some source of information to correct the GPS error.

eg: you're in the middle of the desert, the GPS says you're "here".

What tells this magical system you're really a little more east, north
and down than that GPS estimate?

--
"But I am somehow extraordinarily lucky, for a guy with ****ty luck."
..Harrison Ford, Rolling Stone - 2015-12-02
  #3  
Old February 15th 16, 12:46 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Sam Wormley[_2_]
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Posts: 775
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

Computationally Efficient Carrier Integer Ambiguity Resolution in
Multiepoch GPS/INS: A Common-Position-Shift Approach
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/artic...number=7349142


Integer ambiguity resolution is a challenging technical issue that
exists in real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS)
navigation. Once the integer vector is resolved, centimeter-level
positioning estimation accuracy can be achieved using the GPS carrier
phase measurements. Recently, a real-time sliding window Bayesian
estimation approach to RTK GPS and inertial navigation was proposed
to provide reliable centimeter accurate-state estimation, via integer
ambiguity resolution utilizing a prior along with all inertial
measurement unit and GPS measurements within the time window. One
challenge to implementing that approach in practice is the high
computation cost. This paper proposes a novel implementation approach
with significantly lower computational requirements and includes a
thorough theoretical analysis. The implementation results show that
the proposed method resolves an integer vector identical to that of
the original method and achieves state estimation with centimeter
global positioning accuracy.



Promising.
  #4  
Old February 15th 16, 11:12 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Terje Mathisen[_3_]
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Posts: 25
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

Sam Wormley wrote:
Computationally Efficient Carrier Integer Ambiguity Resolution in
Multiepoch GPS/INS: A Common-Position-Shift Approach
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/artic...number=7349142


Integer ambiguity resolution is a challenging technical issue that
exists in real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS)
navigation. Once the integer vector is resolved, centimeter-level
positioning estimation accuracy can be achieved using the GPS carrier
phase measurements. Recently, a real-time sliding window Bayesian
estimation approach to RTK GPS and inertial navigation was proposed
to provide reliable centimeter accurate-state estimation, via integer
ambiguity resolution utilizing a prior along with all inertial
measurement unit and GPS measurements within the time window. One
challenge to implementing that approach in practice is the high
computation cost. This paper proposes a novel implementation approach
with significantly lower computational requirements and includes a
thorough theoretical analysis. The implementation results show that
the proposed method resolves an integer vector identical to that of
the original method and achieves state estimation with centimeter
global positioning accuracy.



Promising.


Promising indeed, but if this is how they do it, i.e. effectively RTK
without a base station, then the absolute precision will not be improved
to the same degree.

I.e. you need some accurate reference at some point in time in order to
enable carrier phase processing afaik.

Terje

--
- Terje.Mathisen at tmsw.no
"almost all programming can be viewed as an exercise in caching"
  #5  
Old February 15th 16, 09:46 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,338
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

On 2016-02-15 07:12, Terje Mathisen wrote:
Sam Wormley wrote:
Computationally Efficient Carrier Integer Ambiguity Resolution in
Multiepoch GPS/INS: A Common-Position-Shift Approach
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/artic...number=7349142


Integer ambiguity resolution is a challenging technical issue that
exists in real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS)
navigation. Once the integer vector is resolved, centimeter-level
positioning estimation accuracy can be achieved using the GPS carrier
phase measurements. Recently, a real-time sliding window Bayesian
estimation approach to RTK GPS and inertial navigation was proposed
to provide reliable centimeter accurate-state estimation, via integer
ambiguity resolution utilizing a prior along with all inertial
measurement unit and GPS measurements within the time window. One
challenge to implementing that approach in practice is the high
computation cost. This paper proposes a novel implementation approach
with significantly lower computational requirements and includes a
thorough theoretical analysis. The implementation results show that
the proposed method resolves an integer vector identical to that of
the original method and achieves state estimation with centimeter
global positioning accuracy.



Promising.


Promising indeed, but if this is how they do it, i.e. effectively RTK
without a base station, then the absolute precision will not be improved
to the same degree.

I.e. you need some accurate reference at some point in time in order to
enable carrier phase processing afaik.


Or even some manual update saying we are "here" to start the nav
(indeed, how INS' on aircraft work - or did before integration with GPS
receivers - the pilot would enter the position of the starting gate
which is printed on the wall in front of the gate as well as in the gate
map of the airport (Jepp bag)).


--
"But I am somehow extraordinarily lucky, for a guy with ****ty luck."
..Harrison Ford, Rolling Stone - 2015-12-02
  #6  
Old February 16th 16, 11:33 AM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
oriel36[_2_]
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Posts: 144
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

On Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 11:35:22 PM UTC, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2016-02-11 08:34, Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
Jamie Condliffe

GPS is an utterly pervasive and wonderful technology, but it's
increasingly not accurate enough for modern demands. Now a team


It's more accurate than its design goal. Not bad. Perhaps it should
solve the refugee crisis too? Or the financial crisis that will never end?


It certainly is not going to make you and the rest of the RA/Dec dummies any more intelligent and from making nuisances of themselves.

The external references for timekeeping are founded on a single astronomical event that happens once every 4 years and from this observation a continuous stream of rotations formatted in a framework of 3 years of 365 rotations and 1 year of 366 rotations reflect the parent observation of 1461 rotations per 4 orbital circuits.

Then you research the foundations of the 24 hour system and the Lat/Long system where the 'average' 24 hour system substitutes for 'constant' rotation at a rate of 15 degrees per hour and one 360 degree rotation in 24 hours.

You freaks imagine 24 hour system has no historical development, that clocks grow on trees and that stellar circumpolar motion represents a single rotation -

http://hypertextbook.com/facts/1999/JennyChen.shtml


I can come here specifically to this forum and shove the facts down your throats but normally would go to other places to attract attention to the actual system of timekeeping and where it meshes to a close proximity to planetary dynamics.


  #7  
Old February 16th 16, 06:17 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Terje Mathisen[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

Alan Browne wrote:
On 2016-02-15 07:12, Terje Mathisen wrote:
Promising indeed, but if this is how they do it, i.e. effectively RTK
without a base station, then the absolute precision will not be improved
to the same degree.

I.e. you need some accurate reference at some point in time in order to
enable carrier phase processing afaik.


Or even some manual update saying we are "here" to start the nav
(indeed, how INS' on aircraft work - or did before integration with GPS
receivers - the pilot would enter the position of the starting gate
which is printed on the wall in front of the gate as well as in the gate
map of the airport (Jepp bag)).


For cm-level accuracy you need at least the same baseline precision,
something which is very hard to get unless you intentionally seek out
one of the reference markers.

Terje

--
- Terje.Mathisen at tmsw.no
"almost all programming can be viewed as an exercise in caching"
  #8  
Old February 17th 16, 11:19 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,338
Default A New Technique Makes GPS Accurate to an Inch

On 2016-02-16 14:17, Terje Mathisen wrote:
Alan Browne wrote:
On 2016-02-15 07:12, Terje Mathisen wrote:
Promising indeed, but if this is how they do it, i.e. effectively RTK
without a base station, then the absolute precision will not be improved
to the same degree.

I.e. you need some accurate reference at some point in time in order to
enable carrier phase processing afaik.


Or even some manual update saying we are "here" to start the nav
(indeed, how INS' on aircraft work - or did before integration with GPS
receivers - the pilot would enter the position of the starting gate
which is printed on the wall in front of the gate as well as in the gate
map of the airport (Jepp bag)).


For cm-level accuracy you need at least the same baseline precision,
something which is very hard to get unless you intentionally seek out
one of the reference markers.


Sure, but cm level isn't even the basic problem. The basic problem is
any ground truth which the proposed system simply does not have. If the
proposed system is accurate to the 2.54 cm level as claimed and I had a
ground truth of 30 cm, then I would know what the error was. As it is,
most ground truths that one can casually find have errors far larger
than GPS even without SBAS.

--
"But I am somehow extraordinarily lucky, for a guy with ****ty luck."
..Harrison Ford, Rolling Stone - 2015-12-02
 




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